FAQ

How much does it cost to hire a lawyer for my injury case?

Lawyers that handle injury cases usually accept those cases on a contingent fee basis.  The lawyer and the client agree that the lawyer will only be paid if the case is successful.  That means either the case reaches a settlement or the case proceeds to a trial and a...

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My car is totaled, do I get a new car?

Well, not exactly. Indiana law says that if a vehicle is considered a total loss, then the claimant is entitled to receive fair market value for their vehicle. That would mean the value of the vehicle immediately before the crash occurred. If you have a loan on the...

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Can immigrants claim lost wages in Indiana injury cases?

The Indiana Supreme Court recently decided in Escamilla v. Shiel Sexton Company, Inc., that an unauthorized immigrant can claim lost earnings or diminished earning capacity in an injury lawsuit and his/her immigration status is irrelevant and inadmissible unless the...

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How long after an accident can you claim an injury?

In Indiana, all legal claims have a statute of limitations. A statute of limitations is the time limit for filing a lawsuit for any particular claim. For claims of personal injury or property damage, the statute of limitations is two years from the date of the...

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Why File a Wrongful Death Claim?

A settlement in a wrongful death case is not about putting a price on a person’s life. It is about making sure the liable parties are held responsible for what they caused. It will also help the family of the deceased move on financially. This is especially true when...

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What is considered a wrongful death?

A number of incidents may fall under this statue including a death which results from a car or motorcycle accident caused by another’s reckless driving. Negligence in the failure to diagnose a fatal disease, negligent medical treatment, or even neglect and nursing...

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What does invited mean in a Premises Liability Case?

A customer in a business or a guest in your home is an invited guest. They will have a higher legal standing, than a trespasser. Children, even when trespassing, may fall into a category somewhere in between if they are too young to understand a property hazard or...

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Case Evaluation